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Sunday, 21 October 2012

Loose Hair, Roots and Tips


Loose hair

Sometimes you can become completely obsessed with the loose hair. Loose hair is going to happen no matter what you do, it's normal and everyone has them. Overtime my dreadlocks have gone through phases of having loose hair and not having so much, the sooner you stop worrying about it, the happier you will be.

You'll find you get way more loose hairs when it's summer and humid and everything will calm down in winter. If you really need them out of your face, then you can't go wrong with a wool hat/beanie/tam. The wool rubbing encourages frizzy hair and new knots, while also keeping the loose hairs out of your face. Failing that you can always just use a headband to hold them back and forget about them.

If it's a make or break situation and you need them neatening up, you can crochet the hair into it's nearest dreadlock. If you do this over and over again for all the loose hair you can end up giving the dreadlocks an unnatural texture that might not be even across your whole head, but it does work if you can get the technique down. The major problem with crocheting though is that overtime you can really damage your hair. Every time you punch the crochet needle though the dreadlock you're breaking the hairs. So if you do this a lot and break enough hairs it's possible that the dreadlock can pull apart / fall off, especially when they get heavy as you wash them.

I strongly believe that palm rolling is a myth. It's peddled a lot by the companies selling dreadlock products, mainly as a way of rubbing the product into your hair. Palm rolling is when you take a dreadlock and roll it between your two palms - back and forth. Short term you might manage to stick a few hairs into a few dreads but chances are you'll be back to square one once you wash them again.

Rubber bands sometimes recommended to help tame the loose hair. Often they will be placed with one at the root and one near the tip, sometimes with another in the middle of the dread. The problem with rubber bands is that the dreadlock will absorb them over time. Loose hair will dread over the top of the band and so you can end up with rubber bands buried inside your dreadlocks. So I wouldn't recommend rubber bands.

Loose hair will sort itself out over time, either by locking into surrounding dreads, or by forming they're own new dreadlocks. The hair behind my ears and at the top of my neck stayed loose for a very long time, but eventually the hairs naturally formed their own dreadlocks that then locked into larger dreads.

Here you can see a newly formed baby dreadlock that has formed from just the loose hairs by itself.

Roots and Tips

Ok, so we're talking about the roots and the dreadlock-tips specifically now. These are the areas that bother people the most. When your roots aren't dreading then you feel like they're going to grow out and when the tips are loose it looks and feels like it's all falling apart. Fear not! neither are areas you should worry about in the long term.

The roots are going to take a while to get to the point that most people would really like because that only occurs when your dreads have matured. The longer you have your dreads and the longer you leave the roots to their own devices, the faster you'll find that loose section between root and dread start to shrink. For the first year or so it's completely normal to have an inch or two of straight hair before the dreadlock really starts. There isn't much you can do about it. If you take the dread and rub the base in a clockwise motion against your head it is possible to encourage the root tightening, but I wouldn't over do it because you can make your scalp sore. This is obviously normally referred to as 'Clockwise Rubbing'. Do not resort to 'Root Flipping'. This is where you take the tip and thread it through the loose root - temporarily making it tight. Overtime this threading will damage the root and split it, meaning you'll still have the single dreadlock, but it will be linking to your head with two roots.

For the tips, some people like the thin whispy ends and others like the blunt ends. With new dreads it's normal to have loose hair/whispy ends. This can often look a little wild and messy but is actually beneficial for drying. The thin loose tips allow the water to run out of the dreads much faster than the chunky blunt ends. Rounded blunt ends take time to form. You can rub the tips between your thumb and forefinger to encourage the locking and you can cut off some of the loose length to make them look a little neater. If you want whispy-er ends then you just have to either brush or pick at the tips with a needle to get some loose hair out. But whispy ends normally form by themselves when water runs through them.

74 comments:

  1. I backcombed in about 60 dreadies, and I'm torn about the loose hair. I worked so hard getting then the size i wanted , if i just let the loose hair dread on its own will all my hard work be for nothing? Will they look messy?

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    1. The loose hair is normal, all dreadlocks start messy and don't start to look how most people want them to look until they've matured. The 60 dreadlocks that you've made will, over the course of the following months, slowly compress and tighten, forming into dreadlocks. It's impossible to get ALL of the loose hairs backcombed at the start and even if you did, many would still come out when you wash. Over time the loose hairs will join onto one of the surrounding dreads.

      Your hard work won't be for nothing, because the 60 dreads you have made will be the dreads that you ultimately end up with and so the positioning that those dreads have and the thickness that you've created will stay throughout the life of the dreadlocks.

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  2. HEY! I Have started dreads about 4 1/2 months ago doing a natural/neglect method. I have about 90 dreads (so you can imagine how much smaller they are!) SOME are bigger sections then others by a 1/2 inch and those have matured faster than the smaller ones being that i sleep on them. My question is about my roots the thin ones just seem to grow out without getting nappy and I don't do anything to form them (MAYBE, some clockwise help sometimes) the most long roots I have are also behind my ears and closer to my neck. I just worry about root progress on my smaller ones because the roots are so thin. Besides that I have many many loops on the back of my head and the front are starting now to lock up better with getting loops of their own. (will these loops diminish in the future?)

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    1. Roots will sort themselves but it will take a long time, normally around 12 months, but probably longer for natural/neglect, you just need to leave them to do their thing because interfering will generally just slow them down.

      The loops that form at the start form when the dreads shrink and tighten, they don't shrink evenly so you get loops. The loops might flatten a little but won't really go away, it's just what happens with young dreads. As the dreads grow longer you'll find the new growth has far fewer loops.

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  3. ok I am just letting these babies do what they will. The only concern I have left is loose hair I have semi long loose hair all over inbetween dreads, seems like more than normal. Should I actually put these where they belong. It keeps getting worse and longer

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    1. It's definitely normal to have loose hair, everyone with dreadlocks has some loose hair and it's definitely to be expected with young dreads. Over time the hairs will knot up and then join a dread. It's best to leave them be because cutting them will just mean they grow back and they'll obviously be short and shorter hair is less likely to dread and crocheting them in has it's own problems. With young dreads it's sometimes actually preferable as the other alternative is to have super tight crocheted roots with clearly visible lines all between the sections which are made even more visible by the crocheted roots being stiff and standing on end.

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  4. I have a question...I have had my dreads for almost a year and a half now and my progress was coming along good but before I dreaded I used to get my hair pressed alot and now my roots mainly in the top have become to straight to lock and now after washing instead of getting back nappy they just swell up and look very messy can anybody help me its become a huge problem to the point where I am considering cutting my hair which I have had a total of over 5 years and is now even dreaded well past shoulder length and I really don't want to cut it but right now its impossible to look neat please help

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    1. The roots can look swollen when they're tighter on one side. So if you have a length of undreaded root that's tighter on one side it causes the slightly looser side to get pushed out. I myself had this at probably around the same stage that you have and it is indeed very annoying because it's not a particularly attractive or neat look, lots of sort of bubbles of loose hair ballooning out around the roots.

      My hair sort of grew out of it which happens to the majority of dreadlock problems. I'm not entirely familiar with pressing hair but the root hair will be just 'fresh' normal hair that's grown out since you started and therefore shouldn't have ever been pressed or anything. I appreciate that they're annoying to live with when they're not cooperating, when my roots where ballooning out they were visible even when they were tied back.

      What I can recommend is having a look at what you're washing the dreadlocks with. While the roots are misbehaving I'd avoid anything that softens or conditions the hair - apple cider vinegar included and try to 'dry' the hair out a little with sea salt or lemon juice or just more knotty with wool rubbing. This should help encourage the roots to shrink up. If needed you can manually encourage the roots to lock up a little with root rubbing. This is where you hold the dreadlock at the point closest to the root where it's still locked and then rub it against your scalp in a circular motion and it should help encourage the pocket of loose hair to knot up.

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    2. Ok thanks for the tips I've been trying the lemon juice and sea salt for a while I think its helping some...I've also been neglecting them for a while to try and help them get more nappy...btw I started with the 2 stand twist method I was wondering if I took to of my dreads and twisted them at the roots together and let them stay together for a while (not long enough to begin to lock) but could the friction of them being together also help out this process?

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    3. You can rub and twist them anyway you want as long as you don't stress the weaker loose hairs too much. I'm not sure helpful it will be though.

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  5. i just got dreads started a few days ago. my friend used the twist and rip method. i naturally have thick, curly, frizzy hair. i know there are going to be loose hairs but is there such a thing as too much loose hair? he didn't section the hair off really so they aren't in any particular shape and the dreads around the middle/top of my head are also very loose and soft. is this normal or is there anything i need to do?

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    1. Well if your friend wasn't particularly methodical with the T&R I would imagine that they are going to be pretty messy. Young dreads are loose and mad at the best of times and if you're not careful with how they're initially started you're just going to exacerbate the problem. If you're happy with where the locks are positioned then you can leave them be. If you give them the time they require they will fully matt up and lock like they should. The loose hairs will either turn into their own locks or join a neighbour. If those loose hairs continue to be an issue there are things you can do to encourage them along but at this early stage it wouldn't be something you'd need to worry about.

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  6. Hey thanks for all this valuable info and tips! I recently started my journey by twist n rip about 2 weeks ago and have about 80 or so pinky sized 6-9 inch dreads. I have extremely straight, blonde hair so I am surprised that dreads are even possible and I am loving every minute of having them. A friend and I twist and ripped them and she sectioned it out quite well into about 1x1 inch sections, some being smaller than others, but consistent for the most part. Some of the small sections though weren't done too well so I've had to go back and re-do some of the extremely loose ones. My main concern is the ones in the back. Most of the back is at an awkward length to where it constantly grazes my neck and shirt so they tend to come apart especially at the tips quite frequently. Is it a good idea to re-do any, or should I just let them do their thing even if they come apart and are back to completely straight hair?
    thanks,
    T-hawk

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    1. I think you should get those locks at the back to be how you want them to be and then leave them alone. If they come loose once then they'll likely get loose again even if you redo them and in the process of redoing them you'll be effectively starting over. The ones at the back are usually the first to start to mature because you're constantly rolling on them in your sleep so I'd just ignore them for a little bit and trust that they'll start to lock up. You don't need the original T&R to hold tightly, you just need it to hold the clumps of hair together long enough for them to start to mature.

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  7. How di i keep my hair from thinnin out its like it gets thin at the root then gets thicker as it goes up i dont want them to fall out so i double them wat should i do

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    1. You can crochet loose hairs into the base of a dread to add more hairs to it's root or you can congo multiple locks together to double them up. There isn't a lot else you can do, you can't magically grow more hair. Refrain from pulling more than you have to on the weaker locks, don't palm roll or root rub those locks and don't use a crochet hook on them for any reason other than to help add new root hairs.

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  8. My dreads are dreading together at the top? Ive ripped them apart, but that doesnt seem to do much. And also, one or two dread start quite low down, will they dread on their own at the top or not? Thaanks :)

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  9. Ive had my dreads for about a year now and many of them are thinning because I twisted to often and the roots couldn't handle it. I've just recently realized this situation that my dreads were thinning at the roots and was wondering...If I leave my dreads alone would the roots grow back thicker so they can support my dreads in the future? I would think that if the hairs in the dreads broke off that another hair would replace it and over time help support the weight of the dread. I am really worried.

    -Stefan

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  10. i plan on dreading my hair again, but last time i did i had to get rid of the because my roots were messy and all matted together, what do i do to prevent this?

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    1. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YUIB7jl21m4

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  11. Hello, I am in the process of dreading my hair, and its taking a few days since I am doing it myself. So I was wondering since "dirty hair doesn't dread" if you think I should wash my roots to get rid of excess oil with my knotty boy shampoo bar or wait longer, if so how long?I'm only about half way done. Thank you much! :)

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    1. It's advisable to wait 5-7 days after starting them before you wash them. While it's true that greasy hairs won't form many new knots, you'll still want to give the new dreads some time to settle.

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  12. Hi, I started my dreads two weeks ago, I am an African, with curly hair, but chemically relaxed hair. My hair had lot of natural under growth before I dreaded my hair. I cut the tips of my dreads, the permed part because it did not look nice, now it looks awful. Please what can I do? Back comb or blunt the tips?

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    1. Hi Jay, in what way to they look awful? what shape are they and what shape would you like them to be?

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    2. Thanks for your quick response. The tips were so 'lean'. Now that I have cut the tips, they are all scattered, not a particular shape. I used the crotchet method to dread my hair. I probably cut it too close to the knots.

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    3. I just don't want the permed tips. Please what can I do?

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    4. Crochet the scattered tips back into the body of the dread?

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    5. Thank you so much, is that different from blunting the tips? And is it better than blunting the tips? Secondly, I have 30 short slim dreads on, my hair looks so scanty. What can I do? Do I just wait it out till they mature and see if they will look nice? Or add human extensions. I have been wearing hats since I got them in. I really appreciate your prompt responses. Thanks

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    6. It's the same as blunting the tips / it's blunting the tips. You only really have two options with tips, blunt them or leave them loose... and it sounds like they're loose now and you don't like it? You can otherwise shape the tips / cut them to shape or pick the tips loose a little with a needle to get them more to however you'd like them to be.

      If you don't maintain the roots / if you don't re-do them or twist them or anything and just leave them to dread on their own, then they should thicken up a bit.

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    7. I am so impressed by your prompt responses. Thank you so much.

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  13. Hi every week I will retwist my hair.. but my roots is not locking, but the end of my hair is kinda locking.. I had dreads 3 months now.. January 19th will be 4 months.. since I had my dreads I never washed it.. am I doing something wrong? Thank you

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    1. Yea.. if you retwist your hair every week, that hair isn't going to lock properly.. it's just going to be twisted up, it needs to be left alone for a long while without being messed with to lock up and mature properly.

      ...also you're going to want to wash your hair. The "you don't wash dreadlocks" thing is a myth. In reality clean hairs will lock much, much better than greasy, dirty hairs as greasy hairs will slip past each other rather than knot.

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  14. Hi I had a few questions about my new dreads. My hair is thick and curly and over two days I did my dreads myself with no products. Most are pretty soft and loose. The ends are not knotted about an inch on all ends that is just staying twisted together but not knotted. Is this normal for them to be loose and feel as if you could easily undo them by running your fingers through them? I cover my hair when I sleep and have not washed them yet. Second question is I do have loose hairs and can't find anyone to crotchet them in, I don't mind them I just want to be sure they will eventually lock. Guess my concern is that they will fall out after all my work. They are still holding together just don't want them coming out completely.

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    1. It depends on how you started your dreadlocks, how well you were at that chosen method and how long it's been since you started them. Since you've said that you are yet to wash them, I would think that they are very new and since they seem to be so soft while being so new, then you might end up in trouble once you do start to wash them.

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    2. Right, that was my concern. They are two days old. I did the twist and rip as I wanted smaller dreads and the back combing with a metal flea comb made my already thick hair huge and it was breaking my hair so I stopped after a few. Any advice on how to get them a bit more stronger/tight? I really do not want to use any product such as wax but I'm thinking a little might help just to hold them together until they lock up a bit more. I washed my hair really good before I started with a sulfate free shampoo so I don't mind waiting more than a week to wash. Rather try to fix them now verse doing them all over again from the start.

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    3. I could email you a picture maybe? You are the first person that has helped so I'll take any advice you have :) I appreciate it!

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    4. I probably wouldn't be able to tell you a whole lot from a picture. If the hair is still held in the sort of lumps that you T&R'd then I'd just wait and see what happens. The T&R is not for actually turning the hair into dreadlocks, it's for holding the hair in lumps so that over time those lumps will form into dreadlocks. So as long as it doesn't all fall out, you should be fine. Whereas if it does all fall out... well then it would need starting over.

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    5. Makes sense! Thanks for explaining that. So the key is to get the strands I T&Red to simply stay together long enough for them to start turning into dreads. As of now they are all staying in, in some shape or form so I might luck out. Time will tell, I'll T&R the ones that come out, if they do.

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  15. I just want to say thanks! This has been so helpful, I dreaded my 3 year olds hair and it drives me nuts with all the loose hairs.. Reading your blog and comments has me tremendously feeling better

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  16. Hi! I'm black, and have had dreads for about a year and a half now, but I am noticing that in the back-left part of my head, there are dreads that are thin in the roots, thick at the top. About 4-5 have popped off in the course of having dreads, but now there is a small patch where there are no dreads, and the hair is really short.

    Is there anything I can do about this?

    Thanks!

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    1. Hi Hadiya. Are you doing anything to the roots of the dreadlocks? Things like twisting the roots can break a few hairs at the roots, it's not really noticeable after each time... but over the course of a year or so the number of broken hairs will add up and the root will get thinner and thinner, becoming weaker and weaker. Then I would think due to the location, the weak roots are getting rubbed around while you sleep on them making the problem worse.

      There are other possible causes, but overworking the roots is the most common.

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    2. Thank you! I think that is the problem.

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  17. Thank you for this. I just backcombed my hair a couple of days ago. I feel like all the work I did was for nothing! I almost feel like I could have backcombed better lol. The roots didn't lock up too well, and they are laying flat but the midsection of the hair knotted up okay. I left the ends loose so I could keep them wispy. I've just been separating them so I don't get monster dreads. I've been thinking about taking them out and starting from scratch again. I haven't washed my hair either since the day I did them. Just been wearing a headband or large knitted beanie. I'm assuming it would be best to tough it out and let my hair take it's natural course now that I already started the process. I'm hoping that first wash will help, too. I started to section my hair, but in the end winded up grabbing sections in bricklay patter and let the dreads fall where they may. I liked the idea of random sized dreads throughout.

    I appreciate all of the time you take to post this information. It has been helpful in starting my journey. Thank you!

    Namaste!
    Ash

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  18. I've got black & red(8) dreads, chest length with extensions & I'm wanting to know if yourself or anyone has advice on dying dreads. I dye my dreads myself & haven't found it a problem other then being a bit uncoordinated but I've had a few hairdressers say this is a big no no because the product could stay inside my dread, over process & could lead to my hair breaking or falling out. I understand this hairdressing talk but I'm finding my home dying job ok for nearly the last year. Any advice or tips?

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    1. Bleaching and/or dying dreads isn't the most fun thing to do.. but it's certainly possible and many, many people regularly dye their dreads. The way I recommend applying bleach/dye is to simply paint it onto the outside of the dread. You don't need to soak the whole thing - no one will be able to see whether it's dyed on the inside etc. You just need to do the outside. A lot of rinsing will be required to remove the excess, but provided you've not soaked the whole thing and you rinse thoroughly, you should be fine.

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  19. Hi, already Had another set where i didnt have this problem, started with tnr.
    Now my new set is 4, 5 months and the top layers, and some other dreads just wont lock up, exemple : my dreads are 1/5 dreaded up from the bottom ( like a litle ball and the rest is just silky curly hair) I know I have to wait more but all the rest of my dreads are dreading normaly, and those just wont and are freezed on that stage.. and its like this sinds month 2.. should I continue to wait ? Seasalt doesnt help :( ( these aréna started with à verrrry light tnr, as good as freeform) what should I do ?

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    1. Hi Sofianne - The lower layers of hair will often lock first and faster because that is the hair which gets moved around while you sleep. The movement encourages knots to form and so the parts that you sleep on go fastest. This leaves the hair on the top of your head and in front of your face to usually take a longer amount of time.

      You have two options - you can either keep waiting. Sea salt will help if you have softer hair, but it's by no means a quick, instant change. Wool rubbing can also help but bringing movement to the areas that aren't getting much interaction from your day-to-day and sleeping.

      Or... you can take those out and start over.... but doing that is no guarantee. You might take them out only to find that in 4-5 months they are back the same again... and you'd have lost 4-5 months.

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  20. Hum okay well, ill stick to sea salt and wait ! I juste havre to stop freaking out hahhaa and ill try wool rubbing, I juste want to help it a little (: combing out is no option (:

    Thx for answering this fast ; and for all your advice, you are a dread guru :')

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    1. Hi Myca. They will all be loose and messy while they're young. The twist and rip is only for holding the hairs in sort of loose lumps - they need to be knotted close to each other and then over the following months the hairs will lock up and tighten... you shouldn't expect the to be locked and tight from day 1 - it takes months :)

      Just let them do their thing - keep them clean, separate them when they start to knot into each other and don't worry about them :)

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    2. Thank you! :)

      Speaking of clean...What method do you recommend for washing and how often for new ones?

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    3. I have always washed mine in the shower. You'll want to be sensibly gentle with young dreadlocks - take it slow. How often you wash them is up to you and your situation - what's important is that you keep the time between washes consistent.

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    4. Fabulous. Many thanks! <3

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  22. Hi there! Thanks for the advice... I just wanted to check because I am a little worried that my friends and I backcombed my hair incorrectly (we did it in one stretch from 11 pm to 5 am in the morning and they were not as tight as they could have been). Now some of the baby dreads are only really knotty at the middle-bottom with more than 2 inches of loose roots. Should I be worried? Do anything???

    Thanks!!!

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    1. The initial backcombed lumps are not representative of the finished dreadlocks (these will take months to properly tighten and form). The only thing you have to be aware of is - if you have not started them tight enough / if you have not put enough knots into them at the beginning, they can wash out.

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  23. Hey there! I backcombed my baby dreads about a week ago and left rubber bands on them till yesterday. after doing some research, i decided to remove the rubber bands. i washed my hair for the first time without the bands today and now i look like a drug addict. i have a lot of loose hair and only a few of my sections even stayed together. should i comb it out and start over? will it fix itself over time? thanks in advance!

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    1. You likely won't gain a whole lot from starting over, unless they were started badly and you'd be able to do better next time. If you simply start over and do the same as you did before... a week later... they'd look like they do now... again. The looking like a "drug addict".. it's kind of how they're going to look after only 1 week unfortunately.

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    2. Thanks very much! i was worried i had completely ruined them by washing my hair.. but thats something you gotta do. i only have 2 sections (on opposite sides of my head) that stayed together. the rest of my hair is super knotted but not really sectioned anymore

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  24. I have had my dreads for a few weeks. Is it ok for me to just leave them? Cus im not so good with the crotchet, so if i just leavet the roots will it be ok? Ive noticed my loose hair starting to attach to dreads, but is it bad if my actual dreads are starting to attach to each other?

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    1. They can be left, they don't need to be crocheted. However they do need to be separated when they start to stick to each other, otherwise they'll combine and grow out joined together.

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  25. I have an issue I think might be more unique than to other people on here. I have a single dreaded rat tail. I've had it for basically 2 years. I mainly just neglect it and let it do whatever it wants and for the most part its worked well. The main body of the dread is tight and the tip is locked up pretty good. The problem is that at the root the dread is super super thin. Much thinner than the rest of the dread and the roots are also no locked up very well... I would like to thicken it up with some more hair but am unsure how to add hair to it. The hair I want to add is the same length as the roots that aren't locked. I'm not sure how its supposed to get added and actually stay in. Am I screwed?

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    1. You'll likely need to grow out the hair that you want to add - it'll need to be longer than the roots. There are a few ways of combining in new hair... however a lot them also carry the risk of damaging some hairs in the process, which you can't really afford to do when your roots are thin as is. If you decide on which hairs you want to add in you can just leave them to do their thing - let the hair grow and don't separate it off from the dreadlock when it starts to get knotted in. Dreadlocks will naturally eat up the surrounding hairs once they get long enough provided you don't separate them out.

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  26. Hey Man!

    Ok... so 4 months or so ago... I went and got fake hair extensions put in… they sectioned out my hair… and then added the extentions… I’ve been back ONCE for a ‘maintenance’ that was basically root flipping with a latch hook… That was like 6 weeks in…

    Fast forward to today... and I’ve decided to take all the extensions out… NOW… SINCE they’ve been removed... I have about an inch to an inch and a ½ of dreaded hair at the roots… and then about 2 inches of wispy/paint-brush like textured tips… Where the extensions were connected the hair has remained in tact.. some of the ‘dreads’ are more notty than the rest.. some are more wispy…

    Should I just leave it, and let it dred up on it’s own? It basically looks like a rats nest.. as I have a bit of curl and wave to my hair…

    Also.. would wearing a wrap or bandana prevent the tips from dreading up??

    Thanks!

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    1. I would recommend leaving at all alone, keep it clean and separate them if they knot into each other.

      A bandana probably won't affect the tips a great deal... but the lack of movement may affect the roots ability to lock as well. Is there a reason you don't want the tips to dread up?

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    2. Yea.. that's what I figure I'll do.. just leave it...

      I would prefer if they did dread up actually... They just weren't/aren't because of the extensions... so it's roughly and inch of root, 2 inches of dread, and then 3 inches of tip.. :)

      I figure they'll likely knot up and shrink... I THINK the part that was exposed dreaded up over the months.. and then when I removed the extensions.. it was as though the rest of the hair (the 3 inches that was in and wrapped around the extensions) is just starting the dreading process now... So I'll just leave them... and hope that it catches up .. :)

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  27. ok i got questions i got synthetic dreads on the bottom and i created my own on the top. can i keep the synthetic dreads on my head and use them. the beads can i use them to help my hair dread faster.

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    1. I'm afraid I don't understand the question.

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  28. So my boyfriend got dreadlocks a little under 3 months ago but they mostly fell out after 2 months. He was so heartbroken that i offered to re do them for him myself. They have been redone for 2 days now and look better than the first time. It would kill him to see them go again. How should we go about looking after them better? Should he wear a beanie to bed? How often should he wash them? How often is okay to wet them? Any tips on mantaining them would be awesome :) thank you

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    1. As long as you get enough knots in at the start, they should hold - that's a combination of how proficient you are at your chosen method and how much hair there is to create knots in. Once he's gotten going they shouldn't be much of a worry as...well.. anyone with a hairbrush knows that knots continue to form and tighten over time whether you want them to or not!

      Wearing a beanie at night is not necessary, it'll make his head uncomfortably warm and can even restrict movement and therefore slow progress.

      He can wash them as often as he likes as long as he keeps the time between washes consistent.

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  29. I have been using the neglect method for about 10 months. however, 5 months into the process I had someone make sections by back combing about a half an inch at the roots. since then they have been dreading as they grow (before the part that was back combed) and also after the part that was back combed. So I have about 3 inches or so that is dreaded. Yet, the part below this doesn't seem to be dreading on most of the dreads. the hair sticks together, but is not locking up below the part that is locked up. I have quite soft hair. Is there something I can do to help them lock up? will they eventually lock up on their own? Or should I back comb the remaining part that hasn't locked up (which I would rather not do because my hair is fine and I will lose a lot of length. Also, the ones that formed completely will be a different length)? Thank you for any guidance you can provide.

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    1. If you waited 5 months, backcombed and then waited another 5 months, the dreads will be 5 months along and not 10... as running a comb through the hair, even if done backwards will set everything back to the start and at 5 months not a whole lot is for certain. It would not make a length difference whether you backcomb the rest or not because the loss of length would be the same whether the dreadlocks shrunk up and tightened of their own accord or whether you backcombed them up... however backcombing through the hair would again set that hair back to the start.. and if the hair is already in sections it would not be at all necessary.

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